Duration of FAA Pilot medical certificates

Many pilots ask if we could recap the duration for their medical certificates. and the frequency for the EKG for the first class airmen.

  1. First Class Medical Certificate: A first class medical certificate is valid for the remainder of the month of issue; plus

o    6 calendar months for operations requiring a first class medical certificate if the airman is age 40 or over on or before the date of the examination, or

o    12-calendar months for operations requiring a first-class medical certificate if the airman has not reached age 40 on or before the date of examination, or

o    12 calendar months for operations requiring a second class medical certificate, or

o    24 calendar months for operations requiring a third class medical certificate if the airman is age 40 or over on or before the date of the examination, or

o    60 calendar months for operations requiring a third class medical certificate if the airman has not reached age 40 on or before the date of examination. *

EKG is first done on the first medical exam after the airman’s 35th birthday.

The next EKG is done on the first medical exam after the airman’s 40th birthday.

After that one EKG is done every 12 months.

Please note that having the EKG in proper sequence with the medical is vital to maintaining the first class certificate.

After 12 months, an airman who does not have a current EKG will lose the first class certificate as it reverts to a Second class automatically.

    2. Second Class Medical Certificate: A second class medical certificate is valid for the remainder of the month of issue; plus

o    12 calendar months for operations requiring a second class medical certificate, or

o    24 calendar months for operations requiring a third class medical certificate, if the airman is age 40 or over on or before the date of the examination, or

o    60 calendar months for operations requiring a third class medical certificate if the airman has not reached age 40 on or before the date of examination. *

     3. Third Class Medical Certificate: A third-class medical certificate is valid for the remainder of the month of issue; plus

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6th Annual International Aviation Medical Examiner Seminar – presenting cutting Edge Technology

Cool gadgets in Aviation! Check out the latest: X2 Biosystem (TBA) and Heart Rate & Pulse Oximeter Monitor – Cutting Edge Technology.

Once every 2 years, the FAA sponsors a medical education program in Europe for Senior Aviation Medical Examiners.  It is a terrific opportunity to learn directly from the top FAA medical leadership.  This year traveling to Munich from Oklahoma City and the FAA medical headquarters were 3 senior staff.  We learned about the new EKG transmission standards, CACI and special issuance rules, and discussed the future of aviation medicine with our colleagues from all parts of the world.

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Revolutionary Virtual Medical Care via Skype Now

Our practice offers virtual One-on-One medical consultation via Skype now. If you do have any concerns about your health or medical issues, video conference is available prior scheduling your on-site office appointment.

Please use our Online Scheduling System to arrange the consultation or call to the listed numbers in our website.

Before your Consultation please fill out “Patient Forms” or be ready to have answers for these questions regarding with your medical history.

 

 

Check out our Locations:

http://www.myflightmd.com/directions/

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Successful Return Of a Career Commercial Airline Pilot

I am a senior aviation medical examiner for the FAA.  Part of my duties is to provide pilot with medical consultations so that despite medical issues, they can continue to be certified his meeting the requirements for duty.

I am a specialist in diagnostic cardiology and use the tools of trade to facilitate special issuance for these pilots.  Doing so often means the difference between continuing one’s career and livelihood or beginning a forced disability or retirement.

I routinely help pilots navigate the administrative hurdles necessary to regain medical certification.   Over the years pilots being examined for FAA certification have chosen me as their primary physician 80% of the time.  They do this because they know that my skills allow me to diagnose earlier and began treatment when needed.

I am also keenly aware that regaining ones medical certification after cardiac event wires an intimate knowledge of the process.  I am often able to recertify a pilot after exactly six months which is the minimum required under FAA guidelines.

As an example of this, the following letter illustrates a routine case of pilot who suffered a myocardial infarction and cardiac stents.  I routinely provide the cardiac  evaluations including stress testing so that a comprehensive report can be submitted to the FAA.

The following letter is taken directly from the records of the pilot who successfully resume his career he currently maintains excellent health.

Courtney Scott, DO

Manager, Aeromedical Certification Division
PO Box 26080
Oklahoma City, OK 73126

Re:  Capt Smith
DOB: 05-22-55

Dear Dr. Scott,

I performed the cardiovascular exam as per protocol for the first request for Authorization for Special Issuance of a First Class Medical Certificate.

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HELPING a pilot

“I recently had a rather unpleasant bout with bladder cancer. (not uncommon in ex smokers). During the testing process, they also came up with a kidney stone. Two months later both doctors cleared me to work. (Urologist and Nephrologist). I never did pass the stone. AMAS guided me through the whole deal, and sent my paperwork to the FAA on April 7th. Next step? Wait 8+ weeks to get my special issuance. I talked to my AME, Ray Basri who is sympathetic to pilots being held to unfair/Godlike medical standards…He made phone call, lobbied for me and after 4 days, he issued me a special issuance medical. He seams to have a VERY good working relationship with the Northeast region flight surgeon. It most certainly greased some wheels. 56+ days vs. 4 days.

I post this because there aren’t many AME who are truly interested in actually HELPING a pilot. Its easier to just move to the next guy. Ray is qualified as a “super” AME by the FAA. (not sure what that means exactly)

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